Out of This World! Jewelry in the Space Age Exhibit

In June I had the pleasure of visiting the Out of This World! Jewelry in the Space Age exhibit twice, currently on display at The Forbes Galleries in NYC. The first event was part of a talk with conceptual gem artist John Hatleberg, who has several pieces on display. The event was organized by the Association for the Study of Jewelry and Related Arts (ASJRA) and its co-director, Elyse Zorn Karlin, who guest curated the exhibit. At the second event Elyse gave a private tour of the exhibit to a small group. Both times I was struck by how much detail and information could be packed into the small exhibit. The jewelry gallery at Forbes is just one room but this exhibit, which includes over 100 pieces, contains so many amazing pieces of jewelry. With just a few days left until the exhibit closes, it is a must-see for all you jewelry and space geeks!

SpaceJewelrycover

“The purpose of this exhibition is to document how the history of space exploration has been reflected in our popular culture through both fine and non-precious jewelry and to showcase the beautiful and whimsical jewels that are being crafted today as jewelers continue to ponder the mysteries of the universe.” — Elyse Zorn Karlin, Guest Curator

Although the exhibit is centered around jewelry inspired by and related to space, there is also great non-jewelry memorabilia to go with the gems — a space ship sewing set from the 1930’s, a space cadet thermos, and a space-themed toy piano from the 1950’s all contribute to the far-out feeling of the exhibit:

Photo courtesy of Forbes Galleries

Photo courtesy of Forbes Galleries

The centerpiece of the room, which is the first item you see as you walk into the main area of the exhibit, is the Tampa Necklace by Van Cleef & Arpels. This one-of-a-kind piece, from a private collection, contains a multitude of diamonds and gemstones — round, baguette, and rose cut diamonds; pink, purple, blue, and yellow sapphires; onyx; orange garnets; red spinels; and beryl. It was created in 2010 and was inspired by the science fiction novel From the Earth to the Moon by Jules Verne:

Photo courtesy of Forbes Galleries

Photo courtesy of Forbes Galleries

The movement in this piece is incredible, the way the diamond trail of the rocket has swirled around the neck several times, and the burst of orange air beneath it. An ingenious part of this design is the large yellow sapphire at the bottom of the piece, which has an orange garnet set underneath it that shows through because of how thin the yellow sapphire is. It adds to the dream-like fantasy of the piece. Along with that, this necklace can be worn nine different ways, since it is made up of detachable and interchangeable pieces. Such a fantastic piece, especially for this exhibit!

The exhibition contains a wide range of jewelry, with items from the dawn of the space age (the late 1950’s to 1960’s) along with contemporary pieces, like the Venus Earrings by Steven Kretchmer Design:

Photo courtesy of Forbes Galleries

Photo courtesy of Forbes Galleries

Looking at these earrings you might think, “Cool earrings, I get it, they look like diamonds in orbit”. But they are so much more than that! There earrings are made up of 18 kt gold, diamonds, and polarium, a permanently magnetized platinum alloy created by Stephen Kretchmer. One of the amazing behaviors of polarium is levitation, which is exhibited in these earrings. The diamond discs are not attached to any part of that center rod — they keep their amazing spacing simply because of the poles repelling. How amazing is that!

There is a fascinating section in the exhibition dedicated to jewelry that has flown in space. Astronauts are allowed to take up to twenty personal items on a space mission, with a limit of 3.3 lbs total. Jewelry is often taken as part of this package because of its small size and sentimental nature. Of course having a piece of jewelry that has gone up into space greatly increases its value as well, and many pieces can fetch between $50,000 – $100,000 at auction, depending on which astronaut it belonged to. One of my favorite pieces is a Towson watch worn in space by commander Gerhard P.J. Thijiele, on loan from the National Watch and Clock Museum, which was worn on US Space Shuttle Mission SS-99 from February 11th-22nd, 2000. The date on the watch is permanently set to the 22nd, the last day of the mission. Looking at the worn leather band and the stopped clock you can almost imagine it has soaked up special space powers!

If you thought the idea of having items on display that have been in space was cool, another section of the exhibit features jewelry created using materials that come from space. This includes meteorites, tektite, moldavite, pallasite, and moissanite. A fun example of this is the Kitchen Sink ring by John Hatleberg:

Photo courtesy of Forbes Galleries

Photo courtesy of Forbes Galleries

This ring is true to its name with a plethora of gemstones set in it — pallasite, white diamond, red emerald, South Sea pearl, zircon, tourmaline, spinel, sapphire, tsavorite, aquamarine, and irradiated diamond. I imagine it is strong fluorescence in these diamonds that gives them a milky glow, which matches so perfectly with the other gemstones in the ring. The green overtone of the South Sea pearl gives the feeling of an alien lifeform’s skin. Couldn’t you imagine this is what the surface of some fantastic alien planet looks like?

I could go on and on about the amazing jewelry at this exhibit, but I would rather leave the surprises for you to see for yourself. The last day of this exhibition is September 7th, 2013, and it is free to the public. If you are here in NYC, treat yourself to a lunch break at this stellar gallery. It is truly out of this world!

P.S. Although I mention The Forbes Galleries a million times in this post, I was not paid or perked to write about this exhibition. I am simply a lover of gorgeous space-tastic jewelry!

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The Geneva and Hong Kong Results! Magnificent Jewels at Christie’s – May 2013

Yes, you read that right, I am finally getting a chance to post about the items up for sale at the Christie’s Magnificent Jewels auction in Geneva as well as the Magnificent Jewels auction in Hong Kong that both occurred back in May. You may remember my post about the jewelry I saw that sold in their US auction back in April. Consider this a summer bonus post! There aren’t any auctions to cover again until September, so this is a fun way to enjoy these amazing pieces a little longer. Let’s dive in!

Lot #1736, “A Sapphire and Diamond Necklace/Brooch, by Cartier”, estimated at $543,664 – $776,634 USD (Hong Kong auction):

Image courtesy of Christie's

Image courtesy of Christie’s

The loop detail on this necklace is such a great touch, since it is wrapped around the innermost “strand” of the necklace. This gives it an amazing three dimensional quality, as opposed to a necklace that just sits flat against your neck. You can see a bit more of the detail here:

Image courtesy of Christie's

Image courtesy of Christie’s

One of the other magnificent aspects of this necklace is the fact that the center area with the sapphire is actually a detachable brooch:

Image courtesy of Christie's

Image courtesy of Christie’s

This 17.95 carat sapphire, of Sri Lankan origin, has also never been heat treated. That gorgeous blue color is completely natural.  Such a beautiful piece!

PRICE REALIZED: $625,176 USD

 

Lot #1611, “An Exceptional Padparadscha and Diamond Ring”, estimated at $1,035,223 – $1,552,835 USD (Hong Kong auction):

Image courtesy of Christie's

Image courtesy of Christie’s

The 73.98 carat padparadscha in this ring was enormous! I couldn’t take any millimeter measurements of it, but it was definitely larger than a quarter. Padparadscha, which gets its name from the lotus flowers of Sri Lanka, is a member of the corundum family, which includes sapphires and rubies. The peachy-brown color of this particular piece was just stunning in person. It was perfectly paired with the rose gold setting, which only enhanced the pink color.

PRICE REALIZED: LOT NOT SOLD

 

Lot #288, (official description not available), estimated at $6,500,000 – $8,500,000 USD (Geneva auction):

Lot #288 Christie's GenevaThis huge 76.91 carat diamond was amazing to breathe on! With an F color and VVS1 clarity, it was great to get to see it unmounted, rather than set in a piece of jewelry as many of the others were at the auction. The culet on this diamond, which is the either pointed or flat facet at the bottom of the stone, parallel to the table (top facet), was flat and quite large. If you look closely at the photo above, in the center of the diamond you can see a large darker circle. When viewed from the top it was very apparent, but it worked well with the rest of the way that the diamond was faceted. So much fun to get to see it out of the case!

PRICE REALIZED: LOT NOT SOLD

 

Lot #283, “A Spectacular and Highly Important Diamond”, estimate “in the region of $20 million” (Geneva auction):

Image courtesy of Christie's

Image courtesy of Christie’s

This 101.73 carat pear-shaped diamond, named “Absolute Perfection”, is the largest D color Flawless clarity diamond to be offered for sale. It was discovered in De Beer’s Jwaneng mine in a 236 carat piece of rough that took a whopping 27 months to polish! At the NYC viewing that I attended this diamond had its own black tent set up in the room, complete with a velvet rope and a guard. No photos were allowed and I couldn’t get very close, but the diamond shone bright in the special lighting and black background. It would have still been Flawless even if I could have gotten close enough to inspect it!

PRICE REALIZED: $26,737,913 USD (world auction record for a colorless diamond)

Harry Winston is the new owner of this diamond, and has since renamed it “Winston Legacy”. Another fun fact is that the Geneva sale totaled $102.1 million USD, the highest result ever for a various-owner jewelry auction at Christie’s.

 

Wasn’t that a nice distraction from all the record-breaking temperatures here in NYC this week? Which lot did you like the best? I loved the loops of the sapphire and diamond necklace, along with the fact that it could be converted to just a brooch. At that price it’s nice to have two pieces of jewelry in one! I was also a bit surprised that the padparadscha ring and the 76.91 carat unmounted diamond didn’t sell. They were both such beautiful pieces. Perhaps we will see them again at a future auction!

P.S. Although I mention the name Christie’s a million times in this blog post, I was not paid or perked to write about this exhibition. I am simply a lover of gorgeous gems, especially the ones that I get to try on!

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